Prime Song of the Vikings: Snorri and the Making of Norse Myths – Hometrainer-tests.de

Much like Greek and Roman mythology, Norse myths are still with us Famous storytellers from JRR Tolkien to Neil Gaiman have drawn their inspiration from the long haired, mead drinking, marauding and pillaging Vikings Their creator is a thirteenth century Icelandic chieftain by the name of Snorri Sturluson Like Homer, Snorri was a bard, writing down and embellishing the folklore and pagan legends of medieval Scandinavia Unlike Homer, Snorri was a man of the worlda wily political power player, one of the richest men in Iceland who came close to ruling it, and even closer to betraying it In Song of the Vikings, award winning author Nancy Marie Brown brings Snorri Sturlusons story to life in a richly textured narrative that draws on newly available sources


14 thoughts on “Song of the Vikings: Snorri and the Making of Norse Myths

  1. Mr. N. J. Ryalls Mr. N. J. Ryalls says:

    After a delay in receiving this book, I was delighted to be able to read it.Finely detailed , with fine detailed and relevant illustrations, the text is well worth reading and could hardly be bettered


  2. Ned Loh Ned Loh says:

    Saw a good review in the Guardian so bought a copy Found the book well written and it provided a fascinating picture of Iceland and Snorri s role in its history as well as Norse myths Not being a history professional I can t comment on the academic aspects of the book.


  3. Bootleg Bootleg says:

    He s not yet read it but I believe it touches the spot


  4. bilb-weil.de Customer bilb-weil.de Customer says:

    Fulfilled some long held questions about the man A scholarly yet readable book Norse myths have long fascinated me and this book is a valued addition to my library


  5. YuJay YuJay says:

    Awesome book, Excellent condition and delivery time


  6. Mr. Andrew Higgins Mr. Andrew Higgins says:

    A very well research and written book which combines a real Game of Thrones Iceland power struggle which Snorri was in the middle of with a very focused review of Norse myth and theEddas Also some really good work on links with Snorri s mythopeia with that of William Morris and J.R.R.Tolkien Highly recommend.


  7. The Keen Reader The Keen Reader says:

    I saw this book and was utterly intrigued Snorri Sturluson is a name that will be familiar to anyone who has made any study at all of Icelandic history, or of the sagas which are familiar to us today His works he is generally agreed to be the author of the Edda , Heimskringla , and Egil s Saga gave us the first written tales of the Gods, the Giants, the sagas that are inspiration to many authors even today The most well known modern use of those sagas would of course be Tolkien s Lord of the Rings, but Snorri s writing has proved a valuable resource to any study of Norway, Iceland and the Age of the Vikings and beyond.But Snorri was also a major figure in Iceland in his own right landowner, chieftain multiple times over, a figure who was full of ambition and drive, who sought to shape Iceland and its history, but who also sought to shape its future in its relations with Norway And it s rare to find a book which covers that aspect of Snorri so thoroughly and in a manner so eminently readable.The author has written of Snorri from his birth into the family of Hvamm Sturla and his wife Gudny Bodvarsdottir, through his upbringing as a foster son of Jon Loftsson, his marriages, his children and his ambition, through to his untimely death Woven into Snorri s everyday life are the sagas of which he wrote A most interesting man, Snorri seems to have been determined to live his life to the fullest, and to glean every advantage from every day that he can But ultimately in doing so he made many enemies, and failed to protect those who he would later rely on Sometimes there are parallels between Snorri s life and the lives of some of those he wrote about fallible, greedy, acquisitive and thoughtless gods and kings.Utterly and wholeheartedly recommended for anybody with an interest in twelfth and thirteenth century Iceland, its relations with Norway, and the sagas, this life and times of Snorri Sturluson is a great read.


  8. The Keen Reader The Keen Reader says:

    I saw this book and was utterly intrigued Snorri Sturluson is a name that will be familiar to anyone who has made any study at all of Icelandic history, or of the sagas which are familiar to us today His works he is generally agreed to be the author of the Edda , Heimskringla , and Egil s Saga gave us the first written tales of the Gods, the Giants, the sagas that are inspiration to many authors even today The most well known modern use of those sagas would of course be Tolkien s Lord of the Rings, but Snorri s writing has proved a valuable resource to any study of Norway, Iceland and the Age of the Vikings and beyond.But Snorri was also a major figure in Iceland in his own right landowner, chieftain multiple times over, a figure who was full of ambition and drive, who sought to shape Iceland and its history, but who also sought to shape its future in its relations with Norway And it s rare to find a book which covers that aspect of Snorri so thoroughly and in a manner so eminently readable.The author has written of Snorri from his birth into the family of Hvamm Sturla and his wife Gudny Bodvarsdottir, through his upbringing as a foster son of Jon Loftsson, his marriages, his children and his ambition, through to his untimely death Woven into Snorri s everyday life are the sagas of which he wrote A most interesting man, Snorri seems to have been determined to live his life to the fullest, and to glean every advantage from every day that he can But ultimately in doing so he made many enemies, and failed to protect those who he would later rely on Sometimes there are parallels between Snorri s life and the lives of some of those he wrote about fallible, greedy, acquisitive and thoughtless gods and kings.Utterly and wholeheartedly recommended for anybody with an interest in twelfth and thirteenth century Iceland, its relations with Norway, and the sagas, this life and times of Snorri Sturluson is a great read.


  9. Sarah Schneider Sarah Schneider says:

    As a total Viking lover and author myself, there was no way I could NOT buy this wonderfully original book It sheds a different and accessible light on the era of Snorri Sturlusson who should be seen as one of the GREAT writers of the medieval period, bringing to us a richness and variety of stories and history of an era long gone, but still ever present in our times One of my favourite saga books now.


  10. Garry Garry says:

    Very well researched Skillful writer I have liked other books by Nancy Marie Brown and this one is among her best Her research is very exacting and illuminating.


  11. scmccarty scmccarty says:

    I thought I knew very little about Viking lore and paganism until I realized after reading Nancy Marie Brown s book that Viking lore is embedded in J.R.R Tolkien, C.S Lewis and numerous other great fantasy and classical writers In this book, which I would highly recommend for folks who are not only looking for great reference material but also an intriguing historical tale about the author of the Snori Sturluson, the thirteenth century Icelandic man, and chieftain who wrote the Edda It s a fascinating tale for anyone who wants to look beyond Viking lore and into its roots Brown has a deep appreciation and fondness so that is easily carried over in an easy to read, simple, yet thorough analysis and review of one of history s greatest influences on English literature I highly recommend this book to students of English and history alike and you will be satisfied with rich writing, attention to detail, and an author whose love of the subject jumps from page to page.


  12. Carl-Uno Carl-Uno says:

    This very well researched book tells the story of 1300th century writer and poet Snorri Sturluson s life.Snorri was one of the mightiest men in Iceland and also spent considerable time in Norway.During his life he collected sagas, which were verbal histories of the history of Norway and Iceland, all the way back to the foundation of Iceland.For the first time these sagas were put down in writing It is a fact that all we ever know about the Vikings and their religion comes from the writings of Snorri Snorri wrote three major books describing the Viking age and its history and gods.Many big authors, like Tolkien, have got most of their facts from the Viking age from Snorri.As a Swede I learned about Snorri s Edda already in school, but this book contains so much details about the history and myths of Iceland and Norway.


  13. Eric Swanson Eric Swanson says:

    I really liked Nancy s book As an American who has learned about all things Icelandic, Nancy brings a fresh perspective to any discussion of Snorri Sturlason One big advantage is that she has summarized and collected a lot of information written in Icelandic about this complex man and made it available to English speakers Most of what we know about Norse mythology and history is due to Snorri As well, he mentored and supported other Icelandic authors As Nancy shows, his influence has been felt with many modern writers, including Tolkein She also discusses how the National Socialists in Germany perverted Norse mythology to their own evil ends via Snorri s writings I like the way Nancy explains all of the complex relationships, multiple sensual relationships and interrelationships that were a part of Snorri s intrigue filled life in Iceland and Norway He remains an enigmatic, but fascinating person To my mind he was both bad and good In many ways he was the antithesis of his thesis of the heroic Viking His heroic Viking was indeed a myth as well Vikings were human beings But Snorri captured for us the essence of the Viking frame of mind and explains their behavior Perhaps Snorri s quick wit and constant scheming were what did him in, in the end Snorri makes somebody like J.R Ewing on the tv series Dallas seem almost like a virtuous choir boy in comparison, if one can imaging such a contrast However, Snorri was a real man I have no idea how he could have been as active as he was and still find time for his writing Read this


  14. KikiLa KikiLa says:

    Have a very personal reason for reading this book, I am a descendant of Snorri Sturluson as are many, many Icelanders , but was drawn into the book not only because of the family connection but the wonderful storytelling of the author The Tolkien link added an extra sparkle as I had not known that Tolkien was so heavily influenced by Snorri as to use his prose as a resource for character names in his writings Great book